The First 5 Culture Shocks In Canada | From Finland to Toronto

The First 5 Culture Shocks In Canada | From Finland to Toronto


Hello everyoneeeeeeeeeee Today I’m gonna talk about that I had to encounter when I first moved in Canada Number one The first thing that I noticed was probably the amount of cars. Like there are cars literally EVERYWHERE Finland is a small country So the amount of cars I have seen in Toronto ONLY, is probably (equal to) the amount of cars that I have seen in the whole Finland. Like. Ever. In. My whole life. And everybody seems to drive everywhere, like I’m the only one who is walking out there. And the traffic jams are like CRAZY You don’t wanna get in stuck in traffic here. I once tried that and I’m doing it never again! Number twooooooo I have seen school buses only in movies before So…it’s like really cute and adorable that there are school buses here. Students actually get to take a school bus and go to school And there are like smaller buses, like, Not this size but like, they don’t fit as many students in. And then there are like longer buses, and it’s like so cool! It’s probably normal for all the North Americans We don’t have school buses in Finland. Like if you have to go to school and your parents can’t take you, you either walk or you take the (normal) bus in public transport. There are also like traffic rules considering school buses which obviously don’t exist in Finland. Numbeeeeeer three My fingers- Number three. Tax-free prices. Like, when you go to a supermarket or basically any kind of store in Canada, you will soon discover that all the prices that they display don’t include taxes. Which is really weird (to me) because when you go to a supermarket or any other store in Finland the taxes have been calculated already in the price that they display on each individual product on the shelf. So you know that if something costs one euro and 50 cents you’re gonna pay one euro and 50 cents at the cashier But if something is here like Tree 99 dollars You have to remember that there’s also 13% tax that comes on top of that I have made that mistake a couple of times Like I went to buy something and I was like “Ohhhhh, it’s so cheap!” and when I went to the cashier, I was like “waaaait a second, this is not the price I thought I was paying!” Number foooooour This is probably a no-brainer …BUT… …everybody speaks English here! Like, of course, it’s Canada: like English and French are the two official languages here. When you have lived your whole life in, like, small country, in your own bubble and everybody speaks your native language. And suddenly you integrate into a society where your own native language is not the primary way to communicate with everybody else. That has taken the most amount of time to get used to. Because I wasn’t this confident with my English when I came here. No way! Like I used to let my husband to speak for me whenever we were outside And I only responded if somebody asked, like, a straight question from me. Number fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiive In English-speaking countries, it’s common, like, when you meet somebody The common “politeness” that everybody uses is “hi, how are you?” We don’t really have an equivalent of that in Finland. If I translate the question in Finnish, it doesn’t make any sense! Because that’s, like, a question that you’re supposed to ask from somebody you know. And people are asking it from basically every single stranger. Well, it’s a cultural difference but it feels weird (to use it). Sometimes it still gets me like, I get confused when somebody suddenly starts “hi, how are you?” And I’m like: *makes awkward gagging noises* Nobody has ever bothered to explain me (like) I don’t know if you’re supposed to answer it with a question So I’m not sure is that, like, when you don’t want to deal with the question (and you can skip answering it) and you can just go straight “how are you?” Or are you supposed to, like, answer (=I’m good, thanks)… If you don’t know how to start a conversation in English which is something I struggle with “How are you” -thing is something you can even use for hitting on somebody. Which I have come across as well Maybe that’s something that Finnish people could pick up too… …maybe not in that form but… …maybe that’s also the reason why we don’t really talk in Finland. Okay, thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you next time! Byeeeee!!!

Author: Kennedi Daugherty

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