Speaking of Culture | Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem

Speaking of Culture | Turning the World Upside Down, Jerusalem


Anish Kapoor’s monumental work of
sculpture sits at the top of the promenade leading to the museum’s main
building at the highest point of the campus. Five meters high, it is visible as soon
as you approach the museum. The hourglass shaped sculpture is made
of smooth highly polished stainless steel. Its form, reflective surface and
dimensions make it function as a gigantic mirror that reverses
reflections: the sky is on the bottom half and the
ground is on the upper half, along with people looking at the sculpture and the
surrounding museum architecture and landscape. The environmental sculptures of
London-based artist Anish Kapoor usually take simple
forms and follow curved lines. They relate to questions of space and expanse,
reflecting their surroundings and involving the public. The form and
location of this work may make us think about the meaning of time and the
importance of sight, but its title: “Turning the world upside down, Jerusalem”, widens the scope to concepts of
earthly and heavenly Jerusalem and their relevance to today’s world. This site-specific sculpture was
specially commissioned to arrive in Jerusalem for the inauguration of the
Israel Museum’s renewed campus. It pays tribute to the late Teddy Kollek,
mayor of Jerusalem for so many years, whose vision led to the founding and
flourishing of the museum. yeah

Author: Kennedi Daugherty

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