ISTE Standards for Education Leaders | Foster a Culture of Innovation

ISTE Standards for Education Leaders | Foster a Culture of Innovation


Learners need to be agents of their own learning. We want to see students being more of a producer as opposed to consumers of their knowledge. Students have to be empowered–
they have to be empowered learners. But in order for a student to be empowered,
the teacher has to be empowered as well. Our school cultures don’t change very fast,
so how do we as principals and superintendents foster innovation climates that are moving
quicker, right, so that those relevance gaps between what’s happening in schools and what’s
happening outside of schools don’t continue to increase? The ISTE Standards are a great resources because
they allow us to think about what we want people to look like, and be doing, on a day-to-day basis. We want our visioning to be embedded,
or to be rooted, within the ISTE Standards. That is not just a common language for us,
but it’s a language that we’re all talking about online. It’s not just the talk, it’s the learning
that we want to see in the classroom, that we should see no matter where kids are from, no matter where teachers are from, no matter where our schools are from. We know that in order for us to reach our
full potential in this shift of moving toward personalized learning, we need to have instructors
who are ready to make that change and at the same time, understanding
that there’s a continuum of teachers and administrators and leaders and we want to be able to meet all of the individuals
where they’re at. I don’t necessarily see other standard frameworks
that show student standards AND educator standards AND leader standards. It cleans it all up for us and helps us to
focus our goals, since our standards, the ISTE Standards, are not a checklist–they’re
not a chart–they are aspirational goals.

Author: Kennedi Daugherty

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